Piecing Your Life Together After A Surgery Gone Wrong

Today's guest post is all about the healing process after a difficult surgery. If you've had experience with this I'd love for you to comment below! 


When you have something wrong with your health and you prepare to go into surgery, there are high expectations. You never expect that the surgery will go wrong but sadly that can and does happen to plenty of patients who go under the knife.

What do you do after it’s all gone wrong? In this article, we look at various perspectives on how to piece your life together following a medical procedure gone wrong.

Get Compensated for Pain and Suffering

When surgery is not as was reasonably expected or the outcome was poor because of medical negligence on the part of the surgeon and their team, then it’s important to seek appropriate compensation for mistakes made. After all, they’ve just changed your life circumstances and not for the better.

The level of compensation will depend on what the mistake was, whether it can be rectified with a secondary operation or if you’re stuck with the problem for life. The seriousness of the outcome and how it will affect how you live is also a factor. You should seek proper legal advice from a solicitor who specialises in cases of this nature. One good source is the Medical Negligence Experts (www.the-medical-negligence-experts.co.uk/) who’ll know what to do.

How Long is the Healing Process?

If you’ve had one operation and are not expected to go under the knife again to fix the mistake, then you’re then dealing with the healing process.

For instance, with incisions in the abdomen e.g. for a hernia operation, the healing time just for the abdominal incision is around two months. This assumes that you don’t overexert yourself before it’s sensible to do so. You should have been advised about appropriate activity levels in your post-op care too. Follow those carefully to avoid making matters any worse.

Re-Assessing Your Physical Capabilities

Depending on what has actually happened, you may have some physical restrictions on what you’re capable of doing once you’ve healed up completely.

It depends on the post-op advice as to what activity is sensible and those to be avoided. Using the Sleek Technique at this time is not advisable!

It’s important to get the feeling of putting your life back together. Part of this is the sense that you’ve slowly become more capable again, even if you need a little help here and there to achieve that. That’s all good too. Therefore, if you find that going shopping at Tesco and carrying the bags to the car (or bus stop) is too difficult now, make other plans. Shopping online to get food delivered to your door is a great solution. If you still have trouble carrying items to the fridge/freezer, then have a friend or neighbour come over to help you.

Go through a testing phase to see what you can and cannot do now. Then find alternative solutions for things that are challenging or you’re simply unable to do. There is usually always another way to get tasks accomplished if you search for them. Stay positive and focus on solutions, not frustrations. You’ll then feel more empowered and that your life is coming back together again.